Caper Away Productions

Writings of Chad Boudreau

Movie Poster Exhibition – Installation #1

Posted by caperaway on September 12, 2014

batman_returnsThe Movie Poster Exhibition at ComicReaders Downtown does not officially begin until Monday, September 15, 2014, but I hung the first set of six posters today. For each poster set displayed in the exhibition, I will post additional information on this blog and ComicReaders Downtown’s Facebook page to give you a deeper understanding of the posters on display. The posted material might also contain my memories of the movies featured and my personal opinions on the poster designs. Feel free to share your own thoughts and memories when you’re visiting ComicReaders Downtown or on ComicReaders Downtown’s Facebook page.

Installation #1 (September 15)

South Wall

#1
Batman Returns
Release Date: 1992
Type: Advance Poster
This Batman Returns teaser was replaced by the second Batman Returns advance poster (listed below). Reports claim this initial poster was too plain, but, in my opinion, this is a great example of a simple and enticing poster designed to generate excitement well in advance of the movie’s release. The 1989 Batman movie was a massive hit. It would be three years before Batman Returns would hit theaters so imagine the way fans would have felt when they saw this elegant poster hanging in the local cinema. Remember, this was long before the advent of Facebook, Twitter and even widespread use of the Internet.

#2
Batman Returns
Release Date: 1992
Type: Advance Poster
The tagline “The Bat, The Cat, The Penguin” was widely used during the marketing of Batman Returns. Some feel it is water washing over the Batman symbol while others believe it is ice. What do you think?

#3
Batman Returns
Release Date: 1992
Type: Original Movie Poster
This poster is double-sided. This was not uncommon. When back-lit, the colors and images really pop.

West Wall

#1
The Dark Knight
Release Date: 2008
Type: Advance Poster

#2
Batman
Release Date: 1989
Type: Original Movie Poster
We put the poster for the 1989 Batman between two Advance Posters for The Dark Knight, the second installment in Christopher Nolan’s Batman saga. The Dark Knight featured Heath Ledger as Joker. The 1989 Batman, directed by Tim Burton, had Jack Nicholson as Joker. The two portrayals of the Joker begs the question: Which of the movie Jokers is your favourite?

#3
The Dark Knight
Release Date: 2008
Type: Advance Poster
This poster is one of the most sought after Original Movie Posters of the modern era.

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Movie Poster Exhibition – Primer

Posted by caperaway on September 10, 2014

ComicReaders Downtown’s Movie Poster Exhibition begins September 15, 2014. Hundreds of movie posters will be shown over a period of months. Most posters are from The Popcorn Palace, an independent movie theatre in Bengough, Saskatchewan. The selection spans a twelve year period: 1988 to 2000.

The posters in the collection are Original Movie Posters. These are designed and printed by a film studio or distributor in limited quantity for display in movie theatres to promote the film. Vintage movie posters are those printed before the 1980s. Those are rare, hard to find and often show wear and tear.

The Original Movie Posters in the ComicReaders’ exhibition are from 1988 to 2000, but many are considered collectible. Original Movie Posters can become highly valued, prized collector items. There are many reasons for this: the movie is highly acclaimed, the poster art itself becomes a stunning image on its own, or the film has over the years developed a cult following.

Some of the posters in the exhibition are Pre-Release or Advance Posters. These are designed, printed and sent to movie theatres long before the movie arrives. This means Advance movie posters are printed in smaller numbers and often feature artwork unspoiled by cast listings and crew credits. As a result, Advance movie posters are often highly prized among collectors.

Some of the posters show the wear of the years, but many are in mint condition. You will also notice that some posters have fold creases. It was common for movie studios and distributors to send the “one-sheets” to the theatre folded up in a large envelope. That method was stopped in the late 1980s. Posters were then shipped rolled in cardboard tubes.

It is our hope that as you visit us over the months and view the Original Movie Posters that you revisit fond memories of your experiences with movies, but also that you come to further appreciate the often brilliant design of movie posters.

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ComicReaders Movie Poster Exhibition

Posted by caperaway on September 10, 2014

I am very excited to announce that ComicReaders has partnered with a Saskatchewan family to present an exhibition of movie theatre posters.

Over a period of months, ComicReaders Downtown in Regina, Saskatchewan will display geek worthy movie posters.

Installations include franchises like Batman, Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, and James Bond; the animated films of Disney; director spotlights on Quentin Tarantino and Wes Anderson; action heroes, and many, many more.

“The Sherbina family has given us access to more than 3,000 movie posters,” said Chad Boudreau, manager of ComicReaders Downtown. “When I looked at the list of movie posters, I started to remember the first time I saw some of these movies in the theatre or at home. I was in the midst of a memory landslide.”

ComicReaders hopes the general public will have a similar experience when viewing the movie posters.

Posters in the exhibition are from an independent theatre known as The Popcorn Palace located in Bengough, SK. The Sherbina family operated the theatre from 1988 to 2000. The exhibition features posters from those years, with generous additions from a select number of private collectors.

For a dozen years, an old Simplex carbon arc 35 mm projector was used to show current releases at the Popcorn Palace.

“Every weekend was a new adventure in small town Saskatchewan,” said Stu Sherbina, the son of the theatre owners. He grew up in the family theatre and admits it was as awesome as that sounds.

Thousands of movie posters have been admired and stored over the years by the Sherbina family. You can now share their love of cinema and revisit your own memories of modern movie history by visiting the Movie Poster Exhibition at ComicReaders Downtown.

The exhibition begins on Monday, September 15, 2014.

—-
Caper Away Productions is my writing blog, but I’m also one of the owners of ComicReaders, a comic and gaming store located in Regina, Saskatchewan. I am using my blog as a place to put information about a movie poster exhibition I am running in the store starting in September 2014. The store’s Facebook page will link to these blog postings so people can learn more about the show and the posters in the show in order to kickstart discussion in and outside of the store.

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20 Minutes Hiatus

Posted by caperaway on July 10, 2012

20 Minutes will go on hiatus for 2 weeks but for very good reasons. I’ve been asked by an artist friend to work on a comic miniseries pitch. I will work on that until I go on holidays next week. When I get back from holidays, 20 Minutes will resume.

I think those are valid reasons. And as I work on the pitch I will be planning and / or writing each day so that is still daily creativity.

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20 Minutes 12

Posted by caperaway on July 9, 2012

He could not sing but he did it anyway. In the solitude of his empty apartment. In his car on a road trip. On a road trip was best. Zipping down the highway, back straight, eyes forward, one hand tapping out the drums on the steering wheel, the other ready in case it should be needed. It was possible to turn the volume up loud enough so that the outside sounds  were drowned out and all that remained was the belt of the singers and his own voice. He was always a moment behind the lyrics, except during the chorus, and it did not matter if some of the words were butchered. He sang in a voice deeper than the one with which he spoke. All notes were sung in that tone. He had no range.

Open road. He in a pocket of sound. A microcosm. Isolated. Sheltered.

There. A lone wolf walks through a field. It sniffs the ground and pays no mind to the car as it passes. He, the driver, reacts to the sight of the wolf. An alertness returns. The wolf looks out-of-place. That is not a field in wilderness. That is cultivated land. That is people land. Not wolf land. His reaction to the wolf– this desire to take note of it; to remember it– is a sign of how isolated from nature he has become. He is fascinated by the squirrels in the backyard, at play, at the feeder, dashing along the fences as if those were highways built for their use.

He recognizes these squirrels even when they are squished on the road.

There is a beat to the music that fuels him. Foot on the pedal, he wishes for more turns in the road. Some movement other than forward to confirm that he is indeed going somewhere. Small town hugs the road. Gas station. Gas station. Restaurant. Convenience store. Ice cream stand. Locals gathered in the parking lot of crushed gravel. Girls in short shorts. Kids with mussed hair. Guys leaning against their trucks.

In the city there is an ice cream stand. The scene is similar but with more people, and a middle-aged woman no one notices. She has a shopping cart. It is loaded with garbage bags, green. She removes articles of clothing one at a time, tenderly, and drapes them over the metal railing separating the ice cream stand from the parking lot of the neighboring building. She surveys her work. She takes no notice of couples with ice cream, parents making memories with their children, and teens lost in themselves.

The road hums by.

His fingers touch his face, tracing the edges of the bones beneath the flesh. He maps his skull. He then seeks out his scars. Physical evidence of a life lived. He looks at himself in the mirror. There was a time when he could not see in the mirror, and he remembers fondly the time when he first saw the reflection of the strands of hair on the top of his head. No cares then. Just the desire to be taller so he could see in the mirror.

Racing through the grass, shirt unbuttoned, his friends following at his heels. All running. In their minds, he was the leader in this game. In his mind, he was the hero. He believed it.

What he believes now is this: If the music is loud enough, the road long enough, and his tone low enough, his singing ain’t half bad.

****
[20 Minutes is a self-imposed ritual in which I write, uninterrupted, for 20 minutes a day. No self-editing is the goal. Just 20 minutes hammering on the keys. After the 20 minutes, I am allowed to clean up spelling and grammar errors, but the rest must stay as is. 20 minutes a day. Every day. Today is day 12.]

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